MUNFORD "BIG BOLL" FFA
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Principles of Food Production

Course Standards

Introduction to Plant and Animal Agriculture and Safety

1) Research the roles and contributions of plants and animals in meeting the food and fiber

needs of society using government agency data, news articles, and instructional resources.

Identify and describe in an informative text the different aspects of plant and livestock

production (such as product selection, site selection, optimal development, harvesting, and

marketing), and examine characteristics of occupations in the field.

2) Describe the scope and economic importance of plant and animal agriculture in the United

States and the world, using quantitative data compiled by government agencies and news

media. Summarize trends in crop and livestock production in Tennessee, citing information

from the Tennessee Department of Agriculture.

3) Review common laboratory safety procedures for tool and equipment operation in the food

science laboratories, including but not limited to accident prevention and control

procedures. Demonstrate the ability to follow safety and operational procedures in a lab

setting and complete a safety test with 100 percent accuracy.

Principles of Plant Science for Agricultural Production

4) Differentiate between major plant species used for vegetable, forage, fruit, and agronomic

crop production. Describe basic principles of plant science needed to produce healthy crops

for high quality food products.

5) Identify and describe the general growth and development processes of crops used for food

production. Synthesize information from a range of sources to analyze plant anatomy,

physiology, genetics, and reproduction in the context of plant growth and productivity,

including the following:

a. Describe different plant types based on their anatomy and physiology

b. Investigate the relationship between form and function for the major plant

structures

c. Examine the components of the plant reproduction system and identify specific

anatomical features on different species and varieties of plants

d. Demonstrate cross-breeding techniques to enhance identified traits and

characteristics

6) Relate principles of disease and parasite control to the health, growth, and maintenance of

food crops. Compare and contrast methods for disease and parasite controls, distinguishing between prevention and treatment methods.

7) Document, using either a chart, table, graph or graphic organizer, the optimum levels of

specific nutritional factors that influence plant health (such as pH, nitrogen, potassium, etc.).

Identify nutritional deficiencies and disorders and make recommendations for the safe

production of major food crops.

Principles of Soil Science for Plant and Animal Production

8) Evaluate the physical and chemical properties of soils needed for optimum food crop

production. Perform technical procedures to classify soils for agricultural production by

evaluating factors such as soil pH, texture, permeability, drainage class, soil depth, and water

holding capacity. Interpret test results and formulate conclusions regarding production use

suitability.

9) Research the factors that influence soil erosion rates, and compare soil conservation

practices used for maintaining a healthy growing environment for plant and animal

production.

10) Analyze practices for land selection and conservation that ensure optimal productivity in

crop development and livestock operations. Using information from government agencies

(such as Tennessee Extension Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service), cite

examples of best management practices that ensure the appropriate use of land resources

and maximize crop yields and determine the extent to which evidence provided supports

them.

11) Identify environmental factors (such as climate and topography) considered in site selection

to ensure optimal production and economic return for plant and animal production,

depending on intended use and location (rural, suburban, and urban).

Principles of Environmental Science for Plant and Animal Production

12) Research sustainable practices and principles applicable to food crop and animal

production. Craft an argumentative essay recommending management practices for a

specific setting (rural, suburban, urban) by developing a claim with reasoning and evidence

that incorporate soil and water conservation principles.

13) Debate water, air, and noise pollution issues associated with agricultural production, and

recommend control measures for rural, suburban, and urban areas, citing evidence from

specific case studies. Demonstrate adherence to procedures for handling, storing, and

disposing of production waste in compliance with relevant laws and regulations in a variety

of plant and animal settings.

Principles of Animal Science for Agricultural Production

14) Identify the major breeds of production animals (such as cattle, sheep, goats, poultry, swine,

and specialty animals) and their associated food and fiber products, citing specific textual

evidence of characteristics. Explore the basic principles of animal science needed to produce healthy livestock for high quality food and fiber products (such as nutrition, reproduction,

and breed selection).

15) Identify and describe the general growth and development processes of production animals

used for food and fiber production. Analyze animal anatomy, physiology, genetics, and

reproduction in the context of animal growth and productivity, including the following:

a. Describe different animal types based on their anatomy and physiology

b. Examine the components of the animal reproduction system and identify specific

anatomical features on different species and varieties of production animals

c. Demonstrate understanding of cross-breeding techniques to enhance identified

traits and characteristics

16) Research principles of disease and parasite control and relate them to livestock health,

growth, and maintenance. Recommend safe methods for disease and parasite prevention

and treatment, citing established scientific and industry guidelines.

17) Use professional and academic journals and/or publications from UT and TSU Cooperative

Extension Service to research and document connections between proper nutrition and

animal health. Apply principles of proper nutrition to maximize livestock gains and cost

efficiency, by:

a. Making specific diet recommendations, based on animal breed, available resources,

costs, and nutritional requirements and justifying recommendations with specific

textual evidence

b. Differentiating between various diet alternatives to determine which ration is most

cost effective to obtain maximum production

18) Summarize how heritability, selection intensity, and generation interval are important to

genetic change in production animals, including:

a. Explaining how each concept impacts genetic change

b. Comparing and contrasting characteristics of each as a tool for animal producers

c. Determining how long it will take to get specific traits, using each method

Principles of Agribusiness for Plant and Animal Production

19) Identify and critique factors that influence the economics of crop and livestock production in

the United States and the world. Using informational texts and graphic illustrations

published by government agencies, interpret production costs for various types of plant and

animal operations that impact the wholesale cost of food.

20) Using local news media, advertisements, and information from production companies,

explore and compare marketing methods and strategies to develop opportunities for

specialty plant and animal products in niche markets.

21) Identify and describe the American factors impacting global commodity markets. Compare

and contrast, through debate, different factors that impact food prices in specific scenarios (such as the impact of a war, economic sanctions, or weather on local food prices).

Plant and Animal Biotechnology

22) Examine the role and importance of genetic principles in improving plant and animal

production. Summarize the important historical achievements in plant and animal

biotechnology. Research current and emerging plant and animal biotechnologies and craft

an argumentative essay to debate the use of biotechnology in production agriculture. Justify

claims surrounding the ethical, legal, practical, and economic issues related to food

production and biotechnology with evidence drawn from scientific and professional

resources.

 

 

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